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A group of Syrian migrants on the Italian island of Lampedusa have finally been able to leave to seek asylum in Sicily.They are able to apply for refugee status, in accordance with European law, particularly the Dublin II Regulation. It aims to quickly determine the EU Member State responsible for an asylum claim. This is usually the first state through which the asylum seeker enters the EU which, in this case, is Italy.Many may not wish to apply for asylum in Italy, but find it preferable to staying in an overcrowded camp in Lampedusa. But the overall feeling is one of happiness, as one Syrian man explained: “I can’t express my feelings in words. They’re indescribable. We are so happy God helped us to come here. We were so tired from the trip across the sea and from being in the camp…Now we are much better and I hope our future will be better still.” They are accomodated in a ‘first help camp,’ meaning that people should, in theory, only stay for a maximum of three days.However, the reality is vastly different. Migrants will stay in Lampedusa for 20 days on average, with some remaining there for four to five weeks or more. Large groups of Syrians have been known to go on hunger strike against the difficult conditions in the camp. They have seen people who arrived after them leaving before them, which has caused huge tension among the migrants. The two principal buildings in the camp are designed to host 254 people (204 men and 50 women). However, records show this number being exceeded on a regular basis.Federico Miragliotta, the Director of the centre described how far they are making their resources stretch: “In front of the main male-only building is the so-called ‘A2 Hall.’ This former office building has been emptied and adapted to host another 200 people,” he said. “Of course, the camp is still overcrowded. In recent rainy days, when we had an even higher number of immigrants, we offered people shelter in our buses and minibuses.” There has been a recent...